Author Tim Long

I first started underwater photography in 2003 with a Nikinos V film camera. In 2004 I went digital and started using compact cameras in housings. In 2011 having had enough of life sitting behind a desk I became a scuba instructor and housed my DSLR and trained and started working as an underwater videographer, eventually running my own business in Thailand. After smashing my head in on a motorbike without a helmet - please wear a helmet, you never know when a drugged up idiot will come around the corner on the wrong side of the road - I had a brief sojourn into working as an underwater photographer in the Canaries, before returning to the business in Thailand filming and teaching videography. I am currently having a break from the water caring fro my Mum in Northumbria, where I don't get in the water quite as often, but it does give me time to share a bit of what I've learned in over 1,000 dives with cameras in my hands.

Underwater photography and videography tips

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White Balance – Colour correction, part 1. This is a topic I have constantly been putting off, as there are so many different aspects to it, but it has to be addressed, as it is so fundamental to getting good underwater images.  Lets face it which image would you prefer? There are three ways to tackle the problem of the different colour effect produced by taking your pictures underwater.  The first is to use strobes or your built in flash.  This will only work at quite close distance, maximum of 2m with external powerful strobes.  Brilliant for close up macro…

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Underwater Photography and Videography made easy

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Preparation before you go: It doesn’t take that long to prepare your stuff and it will save you a whole heap of hassle.  Do it the day before, in the evening, before you have a drink!  Ask the dive organiser how you will be entering the water and if it will be suitable for bringing a camera. First the camera: Check that you have a charged battery and a memory card loaded with plenty of spare memory.  If you are taking video, remember that they can devour small SD cards. Remove the wrist strap from the camera. Check that the…

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Underwater photography and videography- Tips for divers from a UK diver!

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Why bother taking a camera diving at all?  There’s all that hassle and someone else will have on anyway. I can think of a few good reasons to take a camera. Because it’s fun.  You take pictures all the time and it’s just a fun thing to do! You take them everywhere else why not take a few underwater.  You don’t have to make it THE reason to dive.  Its quite fun to have a picture of your buddy when you are diving, they would probably like it and they might do the same for you.  I am not a…

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Underwater photography and videography- Tips for divers from a diver!

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Choosing a housing and camera, some tips… When choosing a housing and camera there are two annoying things to consider – you might flood or lose it.  This is one of the reasons I dont recommend using your phone.  Whilst the cameras on phones are getting increasingly sophisticated, the chance of loosing it to a leak or simply dropping it are possible. If it’s just a camera, you’ll be annoyed sure but you wont loose valubale other info. There is also the problem of redundancy.  If you upgrade your phone, you need a new housing, they always move at least one…

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